brown stains on bottom (pebble tec)

Stains on the pool surfaces, pool equipment or on the swimmers, or off-color swimming pool water. Discolored but clear water.

brown stains on bottom (pebble tec)

Postby estler » Tue 23 May, 2006 19:21

I woke up yesterday and had a few stains on the bottom of my pool, now today they have multiplied. It almost looks like rust stains. They will not brush out. The pool is clear but has a high PH. Can anyone tell me what it is and how to get rid of it? :(
estler
 

Stain on vinyl liner

Postby Carolyn » Mon 05 Jun, 2006 21:02

I have the same problem. Have you had anyone give you any help?
Carolyn
 

rust stains

Postby Cheryl » Thu 08 Jun, 2006 10:28

Could be algae - need to get an algaecide and liquid chlorine, brush the pool real good, put algaecide and liquid chlorine in then let fi;ter run until pool water is clear.

Cheryl 8)
Cheryl
 

Postby Weeniehead » Fri 21 Jul, 2006 17:50

I work for a major pool builder and see this issue every day.

What you are describing is what is known as Dirt Scale.

Basically, a thin layer of calcium buildup has trapped the dirt on the surface of the pool. This is the reason you cannot brush it away. It's sort of like painting a coat of polyurethane over a spot of dirt on the wall. Unless you break down that calcium buildup, that dirt is not going to go away.

Most people only pay attention to how clear the water looks. If the water is clear, the water chemistry is good. It's not as simple as that, but it is easy.

If you don't already have one, get to your pool supply store and purchase a chemical test kit. The test strips will work, but if you want a more accurate test result, get a kit that includes the drops.

Once you have a test kit, you will want to test the water at least 2-3 times a week. The most important things to pay attention to are PH, Total Alkalinity and Hardness. It is important to keep the PH around 7.2-7.6 to avoid the buildup your seeing.

BTW, there is a very simply way to get rid of that scale. It will take some time but it will work if you put the time and effort into it. All you need to do is drop your PH level to about 6.8-7.0 and BRUSH BRUSH BRUSH. Test the water even more frequently during the process. Like I said, you probably won't notice any improvement right away, but over the course of a few weeks, it will start to fade away.

If you want a "quick fix", you can contact a pool service company (one who knows what they are doing) and they can drain the pool and do an acid wash which will do the same thing as the first method, only faster.

Good Luck!
Weeniehead
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pool stains

Postby kayspool » Fri 21 Jul, 2006 22:14

We are experiencing a similar problem.

:D I was very happy to find that someone had experience with these stubborn stains.
The folks at our local Leslie's have sold us over $150 worth of chemicals, but the stains remain.
I am a little confused about the ph levels you recommended. First you said to keep them at one level, but then suggested lowering the level when scrubbing the stains? Can you clarify? And thanks.
kayspool
 

Postby Weeniehead » Mon 24 Jul, 2006 11:07

You should keep your PH levels at 7.2-7.6 for your normal every-day maintenance.

The lower level I suggested is only to remove the scale deposits.

If you keep the PH this low all the time, the water will start to "eat" at the finish and the finish will develop what is known as Spot Etching. This is not reversible and causes permanent damage to the surface.
Weeniehead
Pool Newbie
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Posts: 3
Joined: July 2006
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Postby jtbFLA » Thu 07 Sep, 2006 16:19

What happens if you don't lower the Ph but just keep brushing - will they eventually go away but take longer?

Also, how long does it take for "Mustard Algea" to disappear after an Algeacide is introduced into the pool?
jtbFLA
 

Postby Pool User » Sat 09 Jun, 2007 15:30

jtbFLA wrote:What happens if you don't lower the Ph but just keep brushing - will they eventually go away but take longer?

Also, how long does it take for "Mustard Algea" to disappear after an Algeacide is introduced into the pool?


The best way to get rid of mustard algea is to shock your pool. I like to shock them up to 20 ppm(chlorine) until the algea is gone. check your water daily to keep the shock level high until the algea goes away. I like to use liquid chlorine. Its much more effective then the packets of "shock". Also make sure your other levels a up to par. Hope that helps
Pool User
 

Postby Buggsw » Sun 10 Jun, 2007 11:15

Algaecide is best used before you have a problem.

Keep your chlorine high and your pH at the low end of the recommended range for your pool type. Keeping the pH on the low end softens the scale and makes it easier to brush away.
Buggsw
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Postby Pool User » Sat 16 Jun, 2007 12:51

Is this the same for inground pools? My stain seems to be growing but only in the deep end. I normally keep my levels in the safe range on the kit.

I noticed today that the chlorine is really low and so is the HP.

Will acid wash work on pools with liners or just cement pools?

Thanks,
Pool User
 

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